Jo Cox: A tribute to a modern heroine

    Jo’s death sparked international condemnation and tributes poured in. A personal friend, Canadian MP Nathan Cullen paid tribute to Cox in the Canadian House of Commons. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, then current U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords, who was wounded in an assassination attempt in 2011, were among international politicians who sent messages of condemnation and sympathy in the aftermath of her killing.

    Barack Obama praised her work:
    “Jo Cox’s selfless service to others made the world a better place.”

    Her husband, Brendan Cox, urged us to remember what she stood for – not the manner of her death. And now, in support of that goal, he has published a book about her life and what she stood for. He says: “After Jo was killed, friends and strangers got in touch saying that I should write about Jo to tell people who she was. That’s what I hope this book will do – explain what motivated Jo, and where her enthusiasm, empathy, and love came from. I want people to understand what she believed, what she fought for, and what she was trying to do. I hope readers will not just understand but be inspired. That way, I hope, Jo can continue to make a difference, long after we lost her.”

    Published a few days before the first anniversary of Jo’s death, the book Jo Cox: More in Common is a moving and passionate portrait of Jo. It shows her as a mother, wife, sister, daughter, and friend as well as activist and MP. It contains thoughts from her diaries and memories from Brendan and others who were close to her throughout her life. It explains the extent of Jo’s expertise in charity, policy, and politics, and looks back at her childhood in Yorkshire – and how her early beliefs and values shaped her work as an MP.

    Then Prime Minister David Cameron said she was
    “a star for her constituents, a star in Parliament, and right across the house.”

    Born in Batley, West Yorkshire, Jo studied Social and Political Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Later she studied at the London School of Economics. She was the first member of her family to attend University. From childhood, Jo was showing signs of the kind of woman she would become. At the grammar school she attended, she was head girl. During summers, she worked packing toothpaste at the factory where her father worked.

     

     

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